Reading: Tracking Our Thinking

Standard

We know that reading is thinking and we also know that it is important to teach our students how to do it.  My students have been picking up on the importances of thinking and how to do it, although when they sit down to do it on their own they just sit.  I realized that I needed to give them more support until they are ready to do it on their own. 

I have a center called Track Our Thinking, in which the students read the books in their book bins and use Post-Its to do their thinking. Previously we have learned it together and practiced the skill in partnerships and independent reading time.  I have a stand up picture frame that I have listed the things we have learned and what they can work on (retelling the story by telling the beginning, middle and end; your schema about the story and pictures; etc).  Here are the resources I have made available to my students that they can choose from during the center:  Tracking Our Thinking on Post,     Sticky Note, Tracking Our Thinking,    Sticky Note Retell,    Background Knowledge, New Learnings and Questions,   Connections,    PostIt, Reminds me,    Important events in a story

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3 responses »

  1. Good thinking AND tracking! I love anything that gets kids thinking about what they’re reading. Another fun activity I used to do was to “think aloud” as I read to students—even with older high school kids. After they got used to me making predictions, inferences, etc., I’d read along, and then I’d stop where I might have made a comment earlier, and tell them, “Say anything!” They’d pick up on it and discuss what was happening. Later, one of the students, a girl who read voraciously, said she had always read a lot, but never stopped to think about reading as much as she did after that activity. I also used a paper with two columns to help them track their thoughts: Read/React. Your post-it note idea is a perfect companion for these. I only wish I had thought of it back then. I’d love to hear of other ways to get our readers thinking. Thanks for all you do for kids!

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